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What do you do all day?

August 28, 2014 | Systemizing | Beth Schneider

By Sandye Linnetz, System and Accountability Coach

Last Sunday I was home relaxing right before family was coming over and I decided to turn on the television. What did I decide to watch? One of my favorite movies - the Sound of Music.

It reminded me of systemizing your business, of course.

Ready to create some systems for your company? Don't know where to start? Well, as they say in the soundtrack from the Sound of Music, "Let's start at the very beginning... a very good place to start..." It's time to develop some role descriptions, folks.

Gather your team together and ask these questions:
• What is your job - your primary function? How would you describe your position to a new hire?
• What do you do all day?
• What are you responsible for?
• Who are you accountable to? Who is accountable to you?
• Approximately how much time do you spend on of your tasks?
• Where are you being most effective? Least effective?
Repeat this for each person in the company.
• Who does what?
• Who's responsible and/or accountable for what?
• What is the location where the work takes place? (home? office?)
• Are any special tools (computer?) required? Who supplies them?
• What is the required physical space like?
• What education and previous experience is required to do each job?
• What are the physical and social requirements (e.g., lifting? language? driving?)
• What special skills, certifications or abilities are needed? (proficiencies with specific computer programs? great phone voice? math skills?)

The next step is for each person - including the boss - to keep a Daily Tracking Log for one week. For five days each of you will write down the specific tasks that you do - just notes; this isn't a diary. It will be helpful to see if tasks are being duplicated and how much time is being spent on each. Create a simple form that will work for every position. This can be a form that allows for 15-30 minute time blocks and short notations.

Now it's time to actually create written role descriptions for everyone in the company. Oops, are you a one-man-band or a one-woman-show? No problem. If that's the case you will write up role descriptions for each of the roles that either should exist or will... someday. Plan for growth. Yes, you may be doing everything right now, but when the time comes - as you grow - you will be replacing yourself, so prepare for it now by writing up those descriptions so that you will know what you are looking for down the road.

It's much easier to fill a position when you know what you are looking for...

Here are some possible headings for your ROLE DESCRIPTION form:
Date:
Title:
Reports to:
Location:
Primary Function:
Key Accountabilities and Responsibilities:
Education and Experience Requirements:
Physical Context/Work Environment:
Other Special Skills/Certifications/Abilities:
Design the Role Description form that will work best for your situation, including whatever information will be of value when hiring or evaluating an employee. Print the forms and make them accessible to all. Review them annually and update as roles change. Add new descriptions as necessary.

Systems are so much easier to design and implement when you have a clear picture of who is on the team and what they can be expected to do. Role descriptions are an important step in systemizing your business and then getting the systems in place!

Yours,
Sandye Linnetz, System and Accountability Coach for Process Prodigy

See the huge benefit in role descriptions, but don’t want to create them yourself? Did you know that we can do that for you? Just get started with a complimentary, no strings attached business review at www.processprodigy.com/consulting
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© Beth Schneider, Process Prodigy, Inc.
Want to reprint this article? Feel free as long as you include the following: Beth Schneider Wachner, President of Process Prodigy Inc., www.processprodigy.com, along with her team of highly sought after operations consultants, reveal to small businesses the insider success secrets billion-dollar corporations pay thousands of dollars for. Specializing in process creation, Process Prodigy tools and techniques have helped entrepreneurs increase productivity by as much as 600%, and revenues by as much as 250%. Visit http://www.processprodigy.com/ and grab your FREE systems starter kit valued at $297.00.


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